Luiz Carlos Trabuco’s Rise Indicates That Any Modern Horatio Alger Character Must Be A Globalist

Few are the number of real life stories where a starry-eyed kid without a cent to their name is able to climb to the rarefied heights of the corporate world. The transcendability of class has long been part of the American mythos, with children being taught from a young age that they can achieve anything they want, so long as they work hard and maintain a positive attitude. And it is not just in America where this dream is shared. All throughout the world, people are inspired by the idea that they too could one day become one of the masters of the universe through their own wits and drive.

But the reality of the modern globalist system has disillusioned many from this hopeful view of the world. Still, the occasional real life rags-to-riches story can be a great source of inspiration for those who would like to transcend their own class circumstance, rising to the top through grit and hard work. And such stories do exist, however rare they may be.

One example is the story of Luiz Carlos Trabuco, CEO of Bradesco, one of the largest banks in Brazil. Trabuco started his career with nothing more than a high school diploma and a healthy supply of ambition. He improbably parlayed that into one of the most successful careers in Brazilian banking history and a position of global eminence. But even Trabuco’s story, upon closer inspection, gives some concerning insights into the real mechanisms by which the young man of humble means became the global financier. It turns out, in today’s globalized world, Horatio Alger’s characters would need to internalize the ethos of the globalist system if they were to stand any chance of success at all.

A Transformation Of Man And Bank

Luiz Carlos Trabuco was a high school graduate in 1969, in the small town of Marilia, Sao Paulo. The young Trabuco had aspirations of attending college but had no money. Coming from a lower-middle-class family, he would be required to work his way through college to have any prospect of attending.

Trabuco found his way to a then-small local bank called Bradesco. He applied and was hired a few days later. Over the course of the next ten years, Trabuco would demonstrate his abilities as an employee and capable manager to his superiors, consistently fielding promotions and moving up through the ranks. Throughout the decade of the ’70s, Trabuco was able to accomplish his original goal. He put himself through college while working for the firm, earning a bachelor’s degree in business administration as well as a master’s degree in social psychology. It was through his academic experience that he first started internalizing much of the modern globalist ethos. This would play a crucial role in not just shaping Trabuco but in how Trabuco himself would go on to shape Bradesco.

In 1984 he was given his first executive position. As head of Bradesco’s marketing department, Trabuco succeeded in driving large amounts of new business to the firm. In 1992, he was appointed head of the firm’s struggling financial planning division.

It was here that Trabuco began taking the firm in a class-conscious, stratified direction. He abolished the firm’s one-size-fits-all banking model, creating separate products and facilities for the bank’s wealthy clients. This proved successful, the firm soon attracted some of the wealthiest clients in the country.

Trabuco also began professionalizing the HR department. The firm stopped recruiting management from within, only hiring outside talent. Ironically, this move meant that Trabuco, had he again started his career, would not have been able to advance under his own policies.

All said, Trabuco’s career has been a portrait of success. But the small town bank that once hired the starry-eyed kid with no credentials is now the global financial powerhouse that wouldn’t look twice at the younger Trabuco.

See: http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/mercado/2016/09/1810520-bradesco-quer-manter-trabuco-na-presidencia-por-mais-dois-anos.shtml

October 10, 2017

Posted In: Banking Industry, CEO Profiles